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PRR era question

Posted: Mon Jul 06, 2020 6:03 pm
by Hotbox
In days of old, when knights were bold, what routing would the Broadway Limited follow between Canton OH and Pittsburgh PA?

And would a "typical" thru freight (destined for the P,FW,&C line) have followed the same path?

Re: PRR era question

Posted: Tue Jul 07, 2020 6:20 am
by Notch 8
Map & a Schedule, Hope this helps

Re: PRR era question

Posted: Tue Jul 07, 2020 9:57 am
by Hotbox
Yep, that helps....thanks!

Re: PRR era question

Posted: Tue Jul 07, 2020 2:10 pm
by Hotbox
That's a lot of interesting information! What does it signify when a city name is in bold font, compared to the cities listed in regular font?
Such as Fort Wayne compared to Crestline. (timetable)

Re: PRR era question

Posted: Mon Jul 13, 2020 8:55 pm
by Notch 8
Hotbox wrote:
Tue Jul 07, 2020 2:10 pm
That's a lot of interesting information! What does it signify when a city name is in bold font, compared to the cities listed in regular font?
Such as Fort Wayne compared to Crestline. (timetable)
I don't have an answer.. can't tell by looking at the schedule.. I'm guessing the type of service offered or hours of operations ?

Re: PRR era question

Posted: Tue Jul 14, 2020 3:25 pm
by Hotbox
Notch 8 wrote:
Mon Jul 13, 2020 8:55 pm


I don't have an answer.. can't tell by looking at the schedule.. I'm guessing the type of service offered or hours of operations ?
Well, I sincerely appreciate the info you posted. The company I spent most of my career with, owned a property in downtown Pittsburgh, and one of PRR's lines runs right in front of it. It would be easy to guess that line was part of the regular routing of the Trunk. But the lines are so convoluted on the west side of Pittsburgh, I wasn't sure of it. But now I am, thanks to you. :wink:


Just guessing, but I'd imagine that most freights from/to the west region (back in the day). probably tied up at Conway, so even back then the passenger trains listed in your timetable might have been the only ones to physically pass both.